Diary of the night vigil V

November 29, 2006
Singapore Democrats

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Charles Tan
28 Nov 06

Politics can bring people together. This sense of togetherness and unity can be put to good use if we have the will to shape this into some form of positive actions.

Tonight, the vigil for Dr Chee, Gandhi and Yap continues. A few supporters whom we had never met before turned up and stayed with us until the vigil ended for the night. It was heartening. This demonstrates that there are Singaporeans who believe in justice and freedoms. Basic democratic principles that have been conveniently forgotten by the PAP.

These are the people who will not allow the intimidation of this government to overwhelm us. These are the people who are willing to emerge from the shadows of anonymity and show their support and solidarity with these three political activists who have been imprisoned for asserting their rights to freedom of speech.

A night out under the stars has achieved more than what we can imagine.

During the vigil, people from different walks of life are miraculously brought together. Views on politics, religion and attitudes towards life are exchanged and challenged. Interpersonal bonds are formed which hopefully will form the bedrock of future group actions.

The imprisonment of the three democracy advocates has not been in vain. There is a silver lining in every cloud. It is up to us to make use of every opportunity that we have, and convert it into something positive.

I understand. Under this politically repressive situation, a simple act of coming to the vigil requires courage. But acting in courage does not mean that one is fearless. It means taking action in spite of fear.

May I encourage those of you who want to join us but are somewhat apprehensive. I ask that you act on your beliefs and take that first step towards overcoming your own fear. There is nothing to fear but fear itself.

Keep vigil with the 3 prisoners of conscience